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June 16th 2017

The war we’re not fighting against ISIS

Islamic extremists recruit their fighters with slick propaganda about Christian history. Exposing the lies should be part of our strategy

Pope Francis has on more than one occasion spoken with respect about Islam and Islamic believers, and after his visit to Burma he said, “The presence of God today is also called Rohingya”, referring to the persecuted Muslim people there…

‘God sometimes uses nobodies’

Stephen Walford was a 20-year-old music student at Bristol University when he experienced what he calls “demonic interference”…
The Gospel for the Second Sunday of Advent is a kind of miracle story in this respect: “all the inhabitants of Jerusalem were going out” to John the Baptist…
Most of us have attended at least one selection interview in our time…
Ten years ago Benedict XVI issued one of the more curious encyclicals of recent times, Spe Salvi (Saved in Hope), about the theological virtue of hope…
As Western Europe is rejecting its Christian heritage, the opposite is occurring in much of Eastern and Central Europe…

A dramatic move on Communion

The debate over Communion for the remarried, which has dominated Pope Francis’s pontificate, has become harder to explain than the geopolitics of the Middle East…
I got an email this week inviting me to a recital by a pianist called Genaro Pereira…
Exactly 50 years ago, in December 1967, I washed up in London, battered and bruised, after having been arrested, violently interrogated and briefly imprisoned by the bad old apartheid security police in Pretoria…
Everything at Once The Store, London WC2, until December 10 Last chance For many years contemporary art has been moving away from the traditional gallery space and, like some great Leviathan rising from the deep, set about invading a wider world…
William Walton wrote enough – Façade, Belshazzar’s Feast, a shattering 1st Symphony and the greatest film score of its time for Henry V – to rank among the unforgettables of English music…
The civilised trappings of a dinner party or a meal in a high-class restaurant provide a fertile setting for drama…
A critic once wrote that Joe Orton, the Sixties playwright, would “rub baby oil into his face until it gleamed…
The Keys and the Kingdom by Catherine Pepinster, Bloomsbury, 224pp, £16.99 The cover of this book shows a photograph of the Queen and Pope Francis, with both laughing…
There’s always something a bit silly about literary prizes…
Jean Twenge’s book iGen is one of the most fascinating – and depressing – texts I’ve read in the past decade…
In all healthy people there’s a natural reticence about revealing too much of themselves and a concomitant need to keep certain things secret…