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July 6th 2018

Sir Alec Guinness reminisced in his memoirs about a visit he made to Mount St Bernard Abbey in 1957, a year after his conversion to the Catholic faith…
The days of the Eucharistic Congress, Adoremus, are going to be a time of special grace for the Catholic Church in England and Wales…

A Picnic that’s gone stale

Joan Lindsay’s 1967 mystery novel Picnic at Hanging Rock, adapted for film by Peter Weir in 1975, is now a mini-series playing on Amazon Video in the US and BBC Two in Britain…
Brideshead Revisited, published in 1945, was Evelyn Waugh’s first explicitly Catholic novel…
Regular readers will know that I keep an eye out for anniversaries, and the coincidence of historical dates…

Diary: by Harry Mount

Why do British men wear socks and jackets during the intense heat? After years of sweating through summer parties, I’ve made a breakthrough in this heat-wave year, dispensing with socks, jacket and tie…

How pride became a virtue

If someone were to produce a word count of one of the most overused words in our language today, I imagine that the word “pride” would come very near to winning the contest…
If you are an American who is unhappy with way the United States has gone the past five decades (and what orthodox Catholic living in any Western country is happy with the way their nation has gone?), there is nothing better than to leave the internet behind you…
James Henry Pullen spent all his life after the age of 12 in asylums…
There are, I suppose, more spiritual ways to spend a Sunday morning than strolling through the urban civility of Cheltenham’s Pittville Park en route to a Cheltenham Festival recital in the Pump Room…
We may think that Parliament can be a little fractious these days, but we are pale shadows of our Tudor forebears…
Dictator Literature by Daniel Kalder, Oneworld, 400pp, £16.99 Daniel Kalder is a very funny writer who specialises in Russian history and literature and has an eye for dark humour, the latter probably a necessity for the former…
Skymeadow Charlie Hart, Constable, 288pp, £16.99 The playwright Terence Rattigan had a rule when he was asked about reviews: “When you’re writing about something you like but about which you have important reservations, the proper thing is to put your approval at the top of the notice and then bring up the reservations afterwards”…
The Story of Britain by Roy Strong, Weidenfeld, 608pp, £30 Sir Roy Strong is known for his reigns at the Victoria and Albert Museum and the National Portrait Gallery…
Huston Smith, a renowned commentator on world religions, submits that you should not judge a religion by its worst expressions, but by its best: its saints…